Archive for June, 2014

379. Sunday 29th June 2014. The things you do when you are doing nothing…

29/06/2014

Monday 23rd June

Sunday 30th June

What can I say about this week?

Not much which would be interesting to our readers.

Usually we try to go somewhere and take photos but not this week.

Here are some of the things we did.

During the regular weekdays when I go to work for 6 hours then come home and in the afternoons I have been varnishing the interior window frames. Most people have painted timber frames. We have lovely raw cedar window frames which were originally stained but those frames getting direct sunlight have faded and to protect them I varnished them around 4 years ago. They needed doing again so that is how I spend my afternoons. Some of the frames and the solid wood front door I used a varnish with a light stain. Even if I do say so myself, they look quite good. Now That I have completed staining three windows and a front door inside and out the other windows need doing as well.  Sigh! Only 6 windows to go.

Saturday we drove to Mackay to buy some items from a Bunnings Store. While in the Gooseponds area we saw the Mackay Fish Stocking Group putting 1,000 Barramundi fingerlings into the Gooseponds. It seems some goose (pardon the pun) releasedaquarium fish into the Gooseponds. The released fish were Tilapia, an invasive species from Mozambique who are multiplying and eating everything in sight. Enter the Barramundi. They are a local highly prized Australian fish known for its fighting prowess when hooked up but better known for its table qualities. We enjoy Barra when it is available at a good price. The idea is the Barra will eat the invader Tilapia  and be an anglers delight in the Gooseponds in a few years.

Any time we are in Mackay we try to visit with daughter Avery, husband Paul and the grandchildren Shelby-Rose and Anakin. After our visit we also visited my sister Sandra and boyfriend Dave. By the time we ready to leave it was dark so we went to Blacks Beach Tavern and shared a Tandoori Chicken Pizza.

We arrived home just on 10pm after such a long day we were ready for bed.

Sunday 29th June.

Okay Okay I know this is all boring stuff. When are we gunna get on the road and visit some new places? I would like to say soon but all I can promise is we are working on it. We are also working on a weekend getaway…soon.

We spent the day pulling out the old water feature and the minimal water pump and installed a new bigger more powerful pump with added features.

We also filled some large pots we received from Sandra and made a new veggie garden and that was the extent of our day.

I plan on something different next week but in the meantime those jobs around the house simply have to get done.

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378. Sunday 22nd June 2014. All quiet in the Whitsundays, until…

22/06/2014

Friday 20th June.

My brother Al and wife Rae are on their annual pilgrimage north to warmer climes. They arrived in Bowen earlier in the week and arranged to meet us for lunch at Whitsunday Sailing Club.

View of Pioneer Bay from the Whitsunday Sailing Club.

View of Pioneer Bay from the Whitsunday Sailing Club.

This is a bonus photo. I was impressed by the diamond sparkling sea when I took the photo. At the time I failed to notice the man at the top of the mast. You will need to double click to enlarge the photo and get a clear view.

This is a bonus photo. I was impressed by the diamond sparkling sea when I took the photo. At the time I failed to notice the man at the top of the mast. You will need to double click to enlarge the photo and get a clear view.

While parking TERIOS (A rear caliper on RALLYE’s all wheel disc brakes has seized) I noticed a Winnebago Alpine Motorhome parked in the carpark. The name on the back was Endless Summer. Hmmm! I thought, digging back in the mist of time. We know, or at least knew the owners of this motorhome. After lunch I planned to put one of our cards under their wiper but as luck would have it, just as I was walking towards the vehicle they started to pull out of the carpark. My walk turned into a trot then a gallop before they drove off into the distance. I finally got in front of them and held up my hand in the time honoured tradition to STOP. They did. Yep! The same people still own the MH and when I showed my card to Peter & Megan K they remembered us. They normally live at Bargara Beach near Bundaberg and as more luck would have it they are travelling with Rod & Bette P, another couple we have known for years who have been travelling on and off for 11 years. We first met Peter and Megan when we had a Coaster Bus and stopped at Balgal Beach near Townsville. Poor Megan was suffering from many sandfly bites and could not venture out in sunlight as the bites became worse. We arranged to meet tomorrow for coffee.

We also had a nice lunch catching up with Al & Rae (well the catching up was nice) but I cannot recommend the sailing club for good meals or good prices. As always parting was a sweet sorrow but we may catch up again when they return around August.

Today we also spent a good portion of the afternoon spending big busks at Bunnings Hardware.

All I wanted was some chair gliders to replace some which were damaged when we placed them in storage 4 years ago. We ended up with a 15 litre drum of paint , a tin of varnish, 2 LED sensor security lights, LED strip lights for the kick board under the bathroom vanity,

The LED lighting in the ensuite set into the kickboard.

The LED lighting in the ensuite set into the kickboard.

packs of LED globes, paint brushes and rollers. Oh well I guess I would have bought these items somewhere along the line anyway it just seems like a lot of money all in one visit.

Oh, we forgot the chair gliders!!!

Saturday 21st June.

We caught up with Peter and Megan and Rod and Bette for coffee at the centrally located Seabreeze Caravan Park at Cannonvale. The four of them are in Airlie for a few days before they too head further north to for the Tropical Coast Wanderers annual Dam Fine Rally held beside the dam wall on the Ross River ,Townsville. They have stopped in Airlie for Rod & Bette to attend the annual Back to Airlie get together and mystery dinner tonight. Rod’s family started the first caravan park in Airlie sometime back in the 60’s. They were pioneers. Along with other pioneers from that era they get together annually to bring out their photos and historical notes and newspaper clippings and reminisce. We had the opportunity to view Rod’s historical photo’s, notes, newspaper clippings and memorabilia as well as other contributions from original pioneers or their families. We only had ten minutes to view the display as it was the last day and the display was being packed away by contributors. As well, Peter is diabetic and his blood sugar had dropped to the point where he needed something sweet.

We had a wonderful night over a dinner of ribs, sweet potato chips and crispy salad. Peter and Megan talked about their history, particularly Peters three encounters with cancer, operations and bouts of radiation and chemo therapy. Megan is a marriage celebrant based in the Bundaberg district.  She has a web site, Marry Me Megan. Peter who was once a Baptist Pastor (he had to stop work when the first cancer was discovered) also acts as a male celebrant but couples usually prefer a female to conduct the weddings.

The meeting with Peter and Megan was a coincidence and a bit of lucky timing to catch up with them. During the course of dinner Peter revealed he was a Power Station designer in his youth and worked at Lake Munmorah Power Station in NSW. I casually asked if he knew Phillip Strong, my brother in law from my first marriage. Indeed, Peter did know Phillip and recalled some lively conversations as I recalled lively conversations as well. Peter was shocked and saddened to hear that Phillip passed away over a decade ago while still in his early 50’s. (I was also shocked at the time as Phillip was s few years younger than me. It seems rather a remarkable coincidence that Peter and Megan just happened to be parked at the Sailing Club on the one and only day of the year when I visited. The further coincidence was they were travelling with Rod & Bette another couple we have not seen for several years and that Peter once worked with my Brother in Law.

What does it all mean???

377.Sunday 15th June 2014. All quiet until the CO-PILOT arrives …

16/06/2014

Monday 9th June

Today is the Queens Birthday holiday.

I had plans.

The weather had other ideas.

There was a strong wind warning. The wind was strong enough to start tearing the tarpaulin covering WWWGO.

There was wind driven rain on and off all day.

It was the sort of day which drags enthusiasm out of the mind and replaces it with lethargy. It was the sort of day you suddenly find you have been sitting in a chair watching the weather as the minutes tick past.

Hmmm! How long have I been sitting here?

I did manage to do some shredding of garden waste between showers and I did manage to rake some leaves only to see them swirl away in the wind and land somewhere different waiting for me to rake them again.

Sigh!

There was a bright start to the day in the early morning gloom. Yesterday I had walked the Centennial Walkway from Shingly beach to the northern end of Abel Point Marina. I enjoyed that walk so when I woke at 5.30 decided, while laying there in the dark, to walk the Centennial Walkway from the Sailing Club at Airlie Beach to the northern end of Abel Point Marina.

Sunrise at Airlie Beach.

Sunrise at Airlie Beach.

The beginning of the Centennial Walkway from the Sailing Club to Abel, Point Marina, Shingly Beach, Whisper Bay and Cannonvale Beach.

The beginning of the Centennial Walkway from the Sailing Club to Abel, Point Marina, Shingly Beach, Whisper Bay and Cannonvale Beach.

Airlie Beach man made lagoon. Popular with locals and visitors alike. Airlie only has a small stretch of sand and at low tide sharp rocks and coral are exposed. It is not the best place for swimming. It is also subject to huge tides, strong winds AND in Summer, deadly box jelly fish. So the lagoon was built. Clean water, lifeguartds, green grass, barbecue facilities, sheltered picnic tables, gardens, showers, toilets and just a relaxing place to be. The shops border the entire length of the lagoon.

Airlie Beach man made lagoon. Popular with locals and visitors alike. Airlie only has a small stretch of sand and at low tide sharp rocks and coral are exposed. It is not the best place for swimming. It is also subject to huge tides, strong winds AND in Summer, deadly box jelly fish. So the lagoon was built. Clean water, lifeguartds, green grass, barbecue facilities, sheltered picnic tables, gardens, showers, toilets and just a relaxing place to be. The shops border the entire length of the lagoon.

The deeper end of the lagoon.

The deeper end of the lagoon.

This is the only section of the walk which has an incline. It is near Coral Point and leads down to a rocky coral fringed beach.

This is the only section of the walk which has an incline. It is near Coral Point and leads down to a rocky coral fringed beach.

The pathway has become a boardwalk of which there are several along the walk to Cannonvale.

The pathway has become a boardwalk of which there are several along the walk to Cannonvale.

The old part of Abel Point Marina. The walk continues along the front of the buildings

The old part of Abel Point Marina. The walk continues along the front of the buildings

The ground was still mostly damp from overnight rain but the air felt fresh and invigorating. I must do this walk more often. Many other people, some jogging some walking, some with dogs and some just strolling were out and about. Council workers who arrive early were cleaning the picnic areas and parks and free barbecues around the lagoon. They do this every morning so families and visitors can see a clean inviting lagoon area. Good onyer to the Council Cleanup guys.

Friday 13th June

The strong wind continued every day and has torn the tarpaulin, almost in a straight line, almost exactly in the middle. Only a few strands remain before the two halves separate entirely.

Sigh!

Today I have a, to me, a humorous work tale to relate.

A year or two before I retired I asked for permission to install and use a second computer monitor screen. It was not long before I wondered how I ever managed to do the type of work I do, requiring several files open at once, with only one screen. Sure, with Windows you can open and shrink screens as needed. Often though when talking with clients I need to refer to information which may appear over several files. With two screens I can read the two files side by side. Other staff realised the advantage I had and agitated for a second screen. When I left, one of the directors was having a second screen installed on a trial basis.

Now jump forward 5 years. Everybody in the office has two screens and they believe it is only a natural and sensible way to work. Two screens is commonplace. This week I had a new monitor screen installed and as a result I now have three screens. The IT guru left no instructions on closing down one screen so I now work with three screens. Wow! What a difference I can have three programmes and files open at once in fact I can have several files open and can switch between them with ease. It was not long before other staff realised I now had three screens and crowded around to see how they work. Works just fine! One staff member commented that it took almost 5 years for management to approve two screens for each staff member and catch up with me now they will have to agitate for a third screen to catch up with me again.

Saturday 14th June

The sun was bright in the sky when I woke this morning so washed the bed linen and hung it to dry.

I baked a Red Velvet Cake in honour of Donnis arriving this morning. I was looking forward to her arrival and we could have coffee, Red Velvet Cake and a dollop[ or three of freshly whipped cream.

I then headed off to Whitsunday Airport at Proserpine. Her plane was due in at 10.45 and after allowing 10 minutes to collect baggage we should be home by 11.30 for that coffee n cake. The cute little regional airport at Proserpine has changed. No longer the free parking outside the terminal or or on busy days in the surrounding undeveloped land. Now it has a two minute limit outside the terminal with parking police moving people on. There is paid parking and it seems the local friendly regional airport has suddenly become big business. Inside the terminal you can no longer buy a coffee and sit somewhere and watch the people and planes arriving and leaving. The only way to get a coffee is to enter the secure area, have yourself and your baggage scanned and pulled aside for a personal inspection. Of course to even get that far you have to get in a queue just to go through the scanner. I no longer felt like a coffee while waiting. Besides, airport coffee is notoriously tasteless and expensive.

The plane (Tiger Air) was 30 minutes late and baggage was another 15 minutes before it started to arrive.

Grrr! My welcome cake and coffee plan was untangling.

It was pushing towards midday and heavy rain was falling by the time we left the airport. WOT THE! The sun was shining when I left home!

Donnis wanted coffee…now! So we visited the Whitsunday Gold Coffee Plantation which is on our way home and which we have never visited. The place has a certain rustic charm with seating spread out in little nooks around the coffee shed. Upholstery is a made from re-cycled coffee bags on top of various farm implements. In all it has a certain anti glam charm about it. Except every seat was murder on my back.

Two coffees and a small muffin cost $14.40…It was cheaper at the airport and this is the place where they grow the coffee.

Donnis brought a head cold with her so she spent the afternoon closing windows, doors and curtains to keep the breeze out and the warmth in. Poor dear. Having a head cold in the tropics is less fun than a head cold anywhere else.

At least we had coffee, cake and cream in the afternoon.

Sunday 15th June 2014

Not much to report today.

Donnis is still unwell and stayed inside rugged up and resting.

The tarpaulin covering WWWGO had completely split down the centre but only the outside seams stopped the two halves from parting. A pair of scissors fixed that.

I removed the tarpaulin and using the biggest piece put it back on WWWGO side to side instead of front to back.

That was the extent of my day.

Sigh!

Perhaps next week will be more interesting.

376. Sunday 8th June 2014. A walk in the forest and a walk on the foreshore…

08/06/2014

Friday 6th June

I finished a task which started several weeks ago.A few days before the CO-PILOT left to visit family in Wollongong and before she took up the nursing contract at Coolah, western NSW. We needed to replace the worn canvas awning material. The awning framework is in good condition but the canvas material has been in place for at least 10 years and apart from being faded was beginning to fall apart. I took what was left of the materialto our upholster/ sailmaker/ shade sails, Kevin, who quoted a price and we said OK go ahead. I chose the new material which is sort of like a shade cloth but is woven, not knitted. It sort of breathes, air and moisture can pass through but gives as much as 90% shade. The old canvas would fill up with water when it rained and we would have to carefully empty the huge water filled bulge. This new material will not hold water and I can see through it but it does give good shade.

I managed to install two of the three shade cloth awnings and have them working correctly by myself. It meant climbing up and down two ladders, push a bit of material into a slot, climb down, climb up and push the material a little in another slot. This was repeated many times until the material was fully inserted and viola it works!

The third awning was a lot higher off the ground and too high to reach although I managed to insert ¾ of the material. The whole assembly would have to be detached from the wall but this involved two people. Ian H, a workmate, agreed to help me after work. He arrived after dark but I had already removed all retaining bolts so when he arrived we had the frame detached, placed on the ground and the cloth inserted and back into place in 15 minutes. It certainly helps to have a second person share the load. Thanks again Ian.

Also during the day I painted the timber laundry stairs and stairs at the end of our verandah with… a paving paint.

Saturday 7th June.

I finished the awnings with a few final tweaks and gave the stairs a 2nd coat then gurneyed off the concrete pad at the bottom of both sets of stairs and gave the pad a first coat of paving paint.

I also ran around the yard with a set of hedge trimmers and tidied up the out of control plants coming through and over the fence with our neighbours.

Although I promised myself the day off tomorrow I will finish the 2nd coat on the concrete pad.

Donnis completed her final shift at Coolah tonight. Tomorrow she is being driven to Dubbo where she will catch a plane to Sydney then a train to Wollongong and complete the family visit she started a month ago.

Sunday 8th June.

I woke to rain and a cool wind blowing from the south. Not the best weather for exploring or painting the concrete pad at the bottom of the steps.

But I did both.

I explored the rainforest walk known as Airlie Creek Rainforest Track. This is a 900 mketre track which mostly follows Airlie Creek into the hills. (http://www.tourismwhitsundays.com.au/destinations/airlie-beach/attractions/the-airlie-creek-track/ ) it starts off as a gentle grade 1 with gravel pathway and progresses through grades 2, 3 and 4 which are mild exertion tracks although in the damp and steep conditions caution is urged. I saw a Whitsunday Bottle Tree, a rare and endangered species. It is only found on this part of the coast up to 20 Klms north and south of this location and only 2 klms inland. It is also only found on 2 of the 74 Whitsunday Islands.

The endangered Whitsunday Bottle Tree.

The endangered Whitsunday Bottle Tree.

saw a good example of a fig tree claiming and dominating a bit of real estate

Large root system of local fig tree.

Large root system of local fig tree.

and a couple of different wood fungi.

A wood fungi found in the damp rainforest beside Airlie Creek.

A wood fungi found in the damp rainforest beside Airlie Creek.

Another wood fungi. These plants actually break down the timber and cause it to rot and return to nature.

Another wood fungi. These plants actually break down the timber and cause it to rot and return to nature.

The track ends at a sheer rock wall with a water dribble. I can imagine it would be quite a sight when in full flow as a waterfall but under conditions to create a waterfall the walking would be hazardous.

Large root system of local fig tree.

Large root system of local fig tree.

After the dampness of the track I wandered over to Abel Point Marina which is worth a walk at any time on any day.

Looking over Abel Point Marina.

Looking over Abel Point Marina.

There is a foreshore walk and boardwalk which runs from one end of the marina (in fact the walk begins way over on Cannonvale Beach) and goes through to Airlie Beach and ends at the Sailing Club. The walk follows the coastline all the way. I dressed for rain and heavy conditions in the rainforest and wished I had taken a change of shoes and shorts for the marina walk. My walk started at Shingley Beach and finished at the northernmost end of the marina and back again. That little trek, with time for a few photos took 45 minutes. The full walk from Cannonvale to Whitsunday Sailing Club is around 3.5 Klms and is level for 97% of the way. At a good pace it would take around 45 minutes also.

 I am sure this is the remains of a steel sailing vessel "STELLA MARIS" which sank during a freak storm on 12th February 2008. It had crashed up against the rock wall of Abel Point Marina. I took photos at the time (along with photos of 63 other boats which came to grief in the same storm. Also at the time it was believed "STELLA" was sitting on another vessel which sank underneath it. Removal of both wrecks was too difficult and as they are not a danger to navigation they have been left in situ.

I am sure this is the remains of a steel sailing vessel “STELLA MARIS” which sank during a freak storm on 12th February 2008. It had crashed up against the rock wall of Abel Point Marina. I took photos at the time (along with photos of 63 other boats which came to grief in the same storm. Also at the time it was believed “STELLA” was sitting on another vessel which sank underneath it. Removal of both wrecks was too difficult and as they are not a danger to navigation they have been left in situ.

 

375. Sunday 1st June 2014. Hospital visit, Hay Point and Botanical Gardens…

01/06/2014

Yesterday I received a call from son in law Paul. My daughter Averyl was in hospital again. This is her third visit this month. Averyl had a kidney transplant and it has lasted her 17 years although it must be about close to needing another. She cannot go on a transplant list until she is on dialysis and so far she has not needed that. All the tests the hospital has carried out have come back negative and it is claimed whatever is causing her pain is not related to her kidney condition. They cannot determine what is causing her so much pain. Pain so great they admit her to hospital, put her on a drip and administer morphine. They carry out tests, pump her full of anti-biotic and she feels well enough to discharge and send her home. On her last admission they said she had a blood clot on the lungs which then was called pneumonia. That was strange as she had not previously been sick with a cold or flu or similar symptoms. It was suggested it may be walking pneumonia (http://www.webmd.com/lung/walking-pneumonia ) which generally does not require hospitalisation and does not create the pain which she is experiencing. It seems the pain is now in her chest and this time they are looking at her heart.

Today, Saturday, I drove to Mackay to see her. On arrival she was asleep in her private isolation room (they are treating her as infectious for some reason and all staff who come into the room must suit up in disposable plastic gown and rubber gloves. I and other visitors on the other hand can walk in and walk around the hospital and talk with other patients and staff and no need to don protective clothing!!! ) I sat beside her bed for awhile but thought it might scare her when she woke to see somebody sitting there. I visited the lounge and read the paper and on my return she was sitting in bed and looking relaxed, healthy and bored. She had no other visitors while I was there so we had a good visit.  Her lunch arrived and to save the serving person the trouble of suiting up I collected the lunch tray and brought it into the room.

Almost 90 minutes later I could see she was tiring and as Paul and the children will be coming for a visit in the afternoon I left so she could have another snooze.

After leaving the hospital I wanted to clear my head so drove with the windows down about 30 Klms south of Mackay to Hay Point. This once sleepy seaside village is now part of a huge coal loading facility. In fact there are two coal loading facilities.

Just a small part of the coal loading storage area at Hay Point. Note some of the ships moored offshore.

Just a small part of the coal loading storage area at Hay Point. Note some of the ships moored offshore.

View of Hay Point from the viewing location.

View of Hay Point from the viewing location.

One is at Hay point where the jetty stretches 1.8 Klms to sea and the main site at Dalrymple Bay the jetty is at 3.85 Klms to sea. Today I counted 30 ships moored offshore waiting their turn to be loaded. In the past I have counted 60 ships offshore. Coal is brought to these coal terminals by rail from 24 mines in the Hinterland behind Mackay. It is a huge area known collectively as the Bowen Basin and contains the largest known coal reserves in Australia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowen_Basin ) I drove to the top of a hill where a viewing area has been set up. The concrete area has a low steel railing set around its perimeter then an area of mown grass followed by low thick scrub all the way down the hill until it reaches the stockpiles of coal. I was amused by a hastily printed sign on a door at the rear of the viewing area.

“High Snake Activity Area in the scrub in front of you.” Stay behind railing.

Hmmm! I wondered. Do the snakes respect the railing and stay on their side? Or is it as I suspect the snakes cannot read English and go where they want?

From the hill I drove down to what is known as Half Tide Beach. It was once a sleepy little village with a bit of a roguish reputation. These days it is still a village surrounded by a giant car park for the coal loading facilities and still has a roguish reputation. The Coal loading and Hay Point Harbour are gradually gobbling the land for their admin buildings and the noise and lights are moving closer to the village. The port operates 24/7, never sleeps, noise never stops and lights and traffic and staff movements continue at all hours. The growth of the harbour continues with the buildings and cranes now visually encroaching on the nearby houses.

Inside the Hay Point Harbour.

Inside the Hay Point Harbour.

On Half Tide Beach itself, at the highest high tide level is a layer, over a metre high of Pumice Stone. Pumice is formed from volcanic eruptions     (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumice ) it is a porous stone and is common to many of the beaches in northern Queensland. I have not seen it or not seen it in such huge volumes on New South Wales south coast beaches. It floats! This is the stuff they make those little skin cleaning stones. It can wear off the tough dead skin on the heel of your foot for example. Although called Pumice Rock, scientifically it is considered to be glass. It is used in many every day products such as some toothpastes, paint products, abrasives, soaps and even as an additive to plant growing medium.

A victim of the last cyclone and tidal surges at Half Tide Beach. In the background is the breakwall made of granite. The breakwall was constructed to join up with a small island just offshore.

A victim of the last cyclone and tidal surges at Half Tide Beach. In the background is the breakwall made of granite. The breakwall was constructed to join up with a small island just offshore.

Half Tide Beach is not the only beach along this stretch of coast littered with Pumice. In this photo in this corner of the beach is much granite which was used in building a breakwall to create a harbour.

Half Tide Beach is not the only beach along this stretch of coast littered with Pumice. In this photo in this corner of the beach is much granite which was used in building a breakwall to create a harbour.

After that uplifting experience I drove back to Mackay and visited the Mackay Botanical Gardens most of which are locked on the weekends.  (http://www.mackayregionalbotanicgardens.com.au/what_can_i_see/welcome ) However the walkway beside the Wetlands Reserve,

Mackay Botanical Gardens and Wetlands Lagoon.

Mackay Botanical Gardens and Wetlands Lagoon.

The Mackay Wetlands Lagoon with walkway to the centre. Keep and eye out for snakes sunning on the planks.

The Mackay Wetlands Lagoon with walkway to the centre. Keep and eye out for snakes sunning on the planks.

View towards the gardens from the walkway.

View towards the gardens from the walkway.

filled with a variety of birds, reptiles and marsupials was open. The restaurant was closed which was not surprising given it has had a variety of owners over the last 20 years all of whom have gone broke. Hmmm! Is there a pattern emerging there? I would have liked a cup of coffee sitting on the deck overlooking the wetlands. (http://www.tripadvisor.com.au/Restaurant_Review-g255338-d3226871-Reviews-The_Restaurant_Cafe_on_The_Lagoon-Mackay_Queensland.html )

Sigh!

From the gardens I drove to visit sister Sandra before the long two hour drive back to Airlie.