474. Sunday 10th January 2016. A walk in the forest and a walk on the beach…

Wednesday 6th January

We joined sister Enid, Ken, Kelly and Jas for a picnic lunch at Springbrook National Park. Oh of course Kel and Jas little balls of energy, Coop and Ollie were there requiring constant watching. Actually to be totally accurate we lunched at the  Tallanbana Picnic Area in this Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area.

After lunch Enid, Ken, Donnis and I decided to do a walk to Purling Brook Falls. Details are as per the National Park website as follows.

Distance: 4km return

Time: Allow about 2hrs walking time. Note: it is easier to walk the track in a clockwise direction. If including the Warringa Pool track, which leads downstream from the base of the falls, add another 2km and allow another 40mins to return.

Caution: Sections of the Purling Brook Falls circuit and Warringa Pool track are part of Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk: arrow markers indicate the walk. This is an arduous walk. Please do not attempt it unless you are a Great Walker and have a copy of the Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk topographic map.

Details: Pass through open eucalypt forest of New England ash Eucalyptus campanulata, where fire-adapted species such as lepidozamias, hakeas and various wildflowers grow, before descending into the gorge to view the falls from below. After crossing the suspension bridge a steady climb through forest brings the walker back to the picnic area. Water flowing over Purling Brook Falls is high quality because its catchment is protected in the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area. Walking in this area is a privilege. Be responsible for keeping the catchment clean—practice minimal impact bushwalking.

Note: After significant rainfall, parts of the Purling Brook walking track may be closed for public safety. Access is generally still available to the western lookout during these closures. Please ensure you check the Park alerts before you visit this park.

We decided to review our walk regularly as Donnis is still recovering from Bronchitis and I have a case of the “wobblies” due to my medication. We finished the walk with me bringing up the rear instead of leading as is usually is the case.

Ken and Donnis stop halfway along the walk at the bottom of the first sheer drop.

Ken and Donnis stop halfway along the walk at the bottom of the first sheer drop.

Tall palms at the base of the escarpment beside the less than tranquil pool.

Tall palms at the base of the escarpment beside the less than tranquil pool.

The walk was worth the effort especially as we stood near the valley floor watching the falls from below.

This is the best place to view the waterfall and the pool at the bottom.

This is the best place to view the waterfall and the pool at the bottom.

Tall palms at the base of the escarpment beside the less than tranquil pool.

Tall palms at the base of the escarpment beside the less than tranquil pool.

Purling Brook Falls.

Purling Brook Falls.

Pool at the base of the falls.

Pool at the base of the falls.

The lower falls at the pool.

The lower falls at the pool.

We cross the Ranger John Stacy Memorial Suspension Bridge, opened in 2015, the bridge takes walkers from one side of the fast flowing Little Nerang Creek (which flows into the Little Nerang Dam several Klms further below in the valley) to the other in order to access a trail to the rim of the escarpment in a loop walk

Entrance to Ranger John Stacey Memorial Suspension Bridge.

Entrance to Ranger John Stacey Memorial Suspension Bridge.

Suspension Bridge over Little Nerang Creek.

Suspension Bridge over Little Nerang Creek.

. From the top of the falls we could see down the valley below to the north end of the Gold Coast, way, way in the distance.

At the end of the walk. Only another 300 metres to the carpark. Sigh!

At the end of the walk. Only another 300 metres to the carpark. Sigh!

Thursday 7th January

We lunched with friends from Bundaberg, Gerry and Pam L, along with their friends and extended family. Lunch was at the Palm Beach Surf Club which is right on the beach with magnificent views to Surfers Paradise to the north and Currumbin Alley to the south.

We noticed flights lining up on the flight path to Coolangatta Airport several Klms to the south. Every three and a half minutes we counted commercial flights from Qantas, Jet Star, Virgin and Tiger Airlines. Currently flights are direct from Hong Kong but flights from mainland China will commence this month. Coolangatta is a smaller domestic airport now equipped for International passenger flights, including Customs and Immigration. Can you imagine with an incoming flight every three and a half minutes to land, taxi to terminal, offload passengers and baggage, be cleaned, re-fuelled, re-provisioned, take on passengers and taxi to runway to a new destination or to be parked at the airport for use later that day or the next. How busy is that airport? It is now rated at the 5th busiest International Airport in Australia.

The Commonwealth Games are to be played on the Gold Coast in August 2018. Imagine the passenger numbers from domestic and international flights and the tourist dollars pouring into town. Town Planners have worked on this increase in tourist numbers and have worked on upgrades to our road system, the airport and keeping our beaches clean and tidy.

Surfers Paradise seen from Palm Beach Surf Club Dining room.

Surfers Paradise seen from Palm Beach Surf Club Dining room.

Another view of Surfers Paradise from near Currumbin Alley.

Another view of Surfers Paradise from near Currumbin Alley.

Afterwards Donnis and I walked along the beach. At one stage we saw a stingray washed up on the beach shallows. As I walked out to photograph this beautiful creature, a wave washed it towards me so I had to jump to avoid being stung as it passed between my legs.

Sting ray in a little bother. It did manage to swim and or get washed into a deeper gully and was able to swim away. Note the barb on the end of the tail. Steve Irwin was killed by one of these barbs on a much much larger sting ray.

Sting ray in a little bother. It did manage to swim and or get washed into a deeper gully and was able to swim away. Note the barb on the end of the tail. Steve Irwin was killed by one of these barbs on a much much larger sting ray.

Friday 8th January

We spent some time shuffling stuff from one location to another. The new cupboard space in the garage is now 50% full. We also shuffled off to Bunnings to find some specific shelving for the new Melamine wall. Bunnings has the required shelf brackets but do not sell the Melamine shelves. In fact I went on line and could not find any supplier who makes the shelves…at least to the size we want.

Sigh!!!

I will have to make them myself.

Or, better yet, have the men’s shed cut them to size.

Saturday 9th January

One of many direct flights from China arrived and passengers were interviewed. The most popular things the passengers want to do is play in the surf and play on the beach.

 

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Responses to “474. Sunday 10th January 2016. A walk in the forest and a walk on the beach…”

  1. placestheygo Says:

    Great hike. I love when the reward is a waterfall:) Neat suspension bridge!

    Like

    • frankeeg Says:

      We expect to be able to visit the Springbrook National Park and take on a hike a few times this year.

      Like

I am looking forward to your comment. Any questions.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: