Posts Tagged ‘Guyra’

486. Sunday 17th April 2016. A drive through parts of western NSW…

20/04/2016

Monday 11th April

Heading west from Gymea we picked up the Great Western Highway. Much of the highway climbs over the Blue Mountains and passes through the fertile plains beyond the Great Dividing Range. The highway begins a steady climb through umpteen small heritage listed towns and is only one lane – both ways. Road works are an ongoing works in progress. I would call it simply the Western Highway and omit the “great”. That said the area is steeped in historical sites. More sites than we can expect to have time to see on this journey.

First up we stopped at the town of Katoomba which sits atop the range at 1050 metres above sea level. In the winter it snows here. Today however it was a pleasant 27° and winter is still around the corner.  We paid the parking fee to visit the Three Sisters

The iconic Three Sisters at Echo Point, Katoomba in the Blue Mountains. Enlarge the photo and look at the first sister on the left. You can see a narrow bridge from the cliffs to the sister.

The iconic Three Sisters at Echo Point, Katoomba in the Blue Mountains. Enlarge the photo and look at the first sister on the left. You can see a narrow bridge from the cliffs to the sister.

Three early settlers found a way to bring horses and wagons through the Blue Mountains and the plains beyond, Their endeavours opened the region to expansion. Those historic expeditioners were. Blaxland, Wentworth and Lawson. Suburbs have been named after them along the road they surveyed. These statues at Katoomba are in honour of the original convict labour used to build the road, the soldiers appointed to keep the convicts working and also to the local aboriginal population who did their best to harass and stop the invasion.

Three early settlers found a way to bring horses and wagons through the Blue Mountains and the plains beyond, Their endeavours opened the region to expansion. Those historic expeditioners were. Blaxland, Wentworth and Lawson. Suburbs have been named after them along the road they surveyed. These statues at Katoomba are in honour of the original convict labour used to build the road, the soldiers appointed to keep the convicts working and also to the local aboriginal population who did their best to harass and stop the invasion.

Tourists simply cannot get enough of the views.

Tourists simply cannot get enough of the views.

at Echo Point

Echo Point is the location at Katoomba where all the tourists buses and other visitors spill their passengers to gawk and go OOOh when they see this spectacular view of valleys and steep sandstone cliffs.

Echo Point is the location at Katoomba where all the tourists buses and other visitors spill their passengers to gawk and go OOOh when they see this spectacular view of valleys and steep sandstone cliffs.

This viewing platform is an on the edge experience

This viewing platform is an on the edge experience

Donnis enjoyed the scenery.

Donnis enjoyed the scenery.

Look beyond the bearded guy in the crumpled hat and note the huge sandstone cliffs of the Grose Valley.

Look beyond the bearded guy in the crumpled hat and note the huge sandstone cliffs of the Grose Valley.

and gape in awe with thousands of tourists at the huge vista which are the Grose and Jamison Valley’s. It is sort of a green version of the Grand Canyon. A very steep narrow staircase leads down to an equally narrow bridge joining the sandstone cliffs to the first of the three sisters.

Atop the first sister with the Grose Valley in the background.

Atop the first sister with the Grose Valley in the background.

Closeup of the foot bridge to the sister. For some reason the bridge is named Honeymoon Bridge.

Closeup of the foot bridge to the sister. For some reason the bridge is named Honeymoon Bridge.

On this occasion my knees failed to live up to the expectation of my mind so we left the walk to braver souls.

Next on the agenda was Scenic World where the operators provide a free multi story carpark. A good thing they do as the lines of people willing to spend big dollars to be terrified meant we would run out of daylight before being able to join the Scenic Railway

This is the end of the Scenic Railway, Note that it sits atop a steep drop to the valley floor.

This is the end of the Scenic Railway, Note that it sits atop a steep drop to the valley floor.

which offers a 52 degree incline whilst dropping over the edge of a cliff then hurtling towards the valley floor before brakes and safety cables bring you to a stop at a platform dangling over yet another cliff above a valley floor further below. See   www.scenicworld.com.au

Scenic Skyway is a cable car suspended 270 metres above the valley floor. The floor is glass!

The Skyway with the glass floor moves slowly across the chasm between to cliffs. To add a little terror it stops halfway while  controller explains something trivial.

The Skyway with the glass floor moves slowly across the chasm between to cliffs. To add a little terror it stops halfway while controller explains something trivial.

Equally thrilling is the Scenic Cableway which descends 545 metres to the floor of Jamison Valley.

Scenic world has three rides which make the strongest person feel trembly in the knees. This is Cableway.

Scenic world has three rides which make the strongest person feel trembly in the knees.
This is Cableway.

But… we had to find accommodation for the night and continued on the Not So Great Western Highway, followed the steep Victoria Pass to Lithgow, a once great Coal Mining Centre and the Military contracted Lithgow Small Arms Factory. The town still has a strong community spirit which accounts for the very modern Workies Club where we had dinner.

Tuesday 12th April – Happy ..th Birthday Donnis

Looking at a map I now realise we will have to compress our days, missing some sights, in order to use the planned route and find our way home by the weekend. We skipped the attractions at Lithgow and pushed on to Bathurst where we drove around the famous Mt Panorama Motor Racing Circuit.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Panorama_Circuit    Most of the track and some of the pit area is open to the public.

Entrance to the Mt Panorama Race Circuit.

Entrance to the Mt Panorama Race Circuit.

The start lines for races.

The start lines for races.

...and the race is underway. Top speed of 60 Kph has been achieved.

…and the race is underway. Top speed of 60 Kph has been achieved.

At the top, Skyline Pass with terrifying steep off camber left and right bends. around the

At the top, Skyline Pass with terrifying steep off camber left and right bends.
around the

I have been watching the Mt Panorama Race, on television, in October each year for all my adult life. It was thrilling driving the same track, at 60 Klm per hour where the professionals are racing at speeds up to 300 KPH. How is it possible?

There is lots to see at Bathurst but we are on a mission to fit in as much as possible every day.

We picked up the Castlereagh Highway and drove to Sofala, an old gold mining town established in 1851.

Boot Hill, the dead centre of Sofala.

Boot Hill, the dead centre of Sofala.

Most of the original houses pre 1900 are still intact, some habited. The narrow street follows the Turon River for all the 300 metres which comprises the town.

At one time Sofala was big enough to have sufficient population to justify a gaol.

At one time Sofala was big enough to have sufficient population to justify a gaol.

Donnis looking for a book at the Sofala Book Store. It was the only store, apart from the pub, which was open.

Donnis looking for a book at the Sofala Book Store. It was the only store, apart from the pub, which was open.

This ancient building was an eatery but not open when we visited Sofala.

This ancient building was an eatery but not open when we visited Sofala.

I was a bit cruel and left Donnis hanging around for awhile.

I was a bit cruel and left Donnis hanging around for awhile.

There is so much history here but we only had time for a walk around, a quick lunch then on to Mudgee.

Mudgee is also an old gold mining town but survives today due to sheep farming. It is a wealthy town, full of attractions but many of the old historical shops and houses have been modernised and in our opinion has lost a lot of its character appeal.

We drove on to Gulgong, birthplace of Henry Lawson, arguably Australia’s greatest poet and the man who appears on the original $10 note along with some town buildings.

The Henry Lawson Centre at Gulgong.

The Henry Lawson Centre at Gulgong.

I have been a keen reader of the collective works of Henry Lawson. Regrettably while travelling my collection of books were stored in our garage. After 4 years in storage and several years just sitting on the bookshelf the books had become musty smelling. I did not feel like moving all those books once more only to sit on a bookshelf and perhaps never be looked again. I gave away my collection.

Sob sob.

For those interested in why I liked the stories  and poems by Henry Lawson, please refer to the following site.   http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poems-book/verses-popular-and-humorous-0022000

The wonderful thing about Gulgong is that it is still old. The gutter/footpath edging is made from rough dressed sandstone.

Gulgong have left the original rough dressed sandstone on place for the gutters and foothpath edging.

Gulgong have left the original rough dressed sandstone on place for the gutters and foothpath edging.

I am so pleased they retained this feature. There is minimal attempt to modernise the buildings.

Musty old building in Gulgong. Despite its appearance it has been fitted out inside with a couple of flats.

Musty old building in Gulgong. Despite its appearance it has been fitted out inside with a couple of flats.

Mmmm. This buthchery has been on this site for 100 years.

Mmmm. This butchery has been on this site for 100 years.

We stayed overnight at the Prince of Wales Hotel, built somewhere around 1875 or earlier and much of the old building is retained and incorporated into a newer but still old style interior.

ONe of the dining areas at Prince Of Wales Gulgong

One of the dining areas at Prince Of Wales Gulgong

POW outside Dining area.

POW outside Dining area.

POW Fireplace for the outdoor dining area.

POW Fireplace for the outdoor dining area.

Wednesday 13th April

Today we elected to turn more northerly and miss the large towns/cities of Dunedoo, Dubbo, Orange and Wellington. I guess my driving plans were too ambitious for the time we have available.

Shortly after leaving Gulgong we turned off on the Black Stump Way, a back road in fair condition. For those unfamiliar with Oz, the Black Stump is/was a mythical/real place in the middle of nowhere with unexplored territory beyond. To say you went west of the Black Stump meant you have gone into countryside unexplored by white man. One such town is Coolah which sits squarely in the middle of Black Stump countryside.

A mechanic shop/panel beater/spray painter at Coolah had a great many old cars dating from around the 1950's. This looks like a Vanguard. Then again it could be another British motor car. Anybody know what it is?

A mechanic shop/panel beater/spray painter at Coolah had a great many old cars dating from around the 1950’s. This looks like a Vanguard. Then again it could be another British motor car. Anybody know what it is?

Trains do not run anymore  in many of the older established towns. This example in Coolah has all the bits and pieces removed from this signal post. Even the station has disappeared and only the tracks, overgrown with thick grass are the only indicators a train once came to town.

Trains do not run anymore in many of the older established towns. This example in Coolah has all the bits and pieces removed from this signal post. Even the station has disappeared and only the tracks, overgrown with thick grass are the only indicators a train once came to town.

In fact Coolah calls itself the Black Stump capitol.    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Stump   It is a small town and like many small towns is struggling to retain is character and to stay alive in the 21st century. It is sad to see many closed shops and knowing young people have to leave town to find work. By coincidence Donnis worked at the hospital here for three months in the winter of 2014.

The road eventually joined the Newell Highway at Gunnedah. (By taking this route we also cut out other towns such as Gilgandra (where I have a cousin – Hi Lance) and Coonabarabran. We stopped for lunch then decided to stop for the night at Tamworth, famous for the Country Music Festival in January each year. We arrived earlier than expected and drove as far as Bendemeer where we stopped for the night.

i30 parked outside Bendemeer Hotel.

i30 parked outside Bendemeer Hotel.

The old pub was built in 1864 and apart from a few modern touches still looks and smells like 1864. The old highway which ran through the town brought traffic and customers to the small town was diverted in 1983/84 and the town is trying to re-invent itself and find new ways to attract customers off the highway.

During dinner tonight we received terrible news. Our good friend Glennis passed away last Friday. Glennis was diagnosed with tongue cancer only a few months ago. She made the decision not to have radiation therapy so she could enjoy her remaining time as best she can.

 

No longer will we meet at various country locations while travelling in our motorhomes. Last Thursday she and partner Eric were married in a simple ceremony on their property in the Daintree Rainforest. Glennis died the next day.

Vale Glennis.

We also heard from my cousin Bob, he has three types of cancer and has elected not to take any radiation treatment as it will only detract from his quality of life and may not give him any longer to live.

Sigh!!!

Thursday 14th April

Woke to a chillier morning than we are used to and drove to Armidale. Wow! It is even chillier here. Having lived at nearby Guyra for 5 months back in 2013/2014 I realised at this altitude (just on 1,000 metres for Armidale and over 1,300 metres for Guyra) it can be cold all year round. Two days ago we were at Katoomba also on 1,000 metres and on first getting out of the car noticed a chill in the breeze. Here the chill occurs without any breeze.

We stopped here to visit friend Greg T who is in a nursing home. Greg is only a few years older than me but has suffered Parkinsons Disease for about 10 years. Recently he acquired Alzheimers Disease. Doctors believe he now has Lewy Bodies, another degenerative disease and he needs constant care. While visiting he stayed awake long enough to recognise our presence but fell into a deep sleep and could not speak with us. His wife Linda and two of their sons, Jason and Gavin spent a good hour with us. I am sure in Greg’s subconscious he knew we were there.

Sigh!!!

Passing through Guyra we stopped to speak with Greg’s third son, Justin, before we travelled the New England Highway to Warwick in Qld before taking some back roads through to Beaudesert and Canungra and arrived home after 10 hours on the road.

Gee it was wonderful falling asleep in our own bed.

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459. Sunday 27th September 2015. At home, pain is the highlight and we travel to Mackay…

29/09/2015

 

No Photos This Week. We Are Too Busy Doing Other Stuff.

Monday 21st September

I visited with my own doctor – or as she calls herself, a Personal Care Provider – and experienced a sense of care and understanding for the first time in over 5 years. During our travels we have had need to visit GP’s in towns in three states. For that reason we have not been able to establish a comfortable relationship with doctors as we were only likely to visit once and or the practise was multi doctor and you did not see the same doctor twice. We were fortunate that in our travels we found two single doctor practises who were caring, informed, pro-active and knew what he was doing. The first was in Guyra and the second, unbelievably was in busy Fairfield a suburb of Brisbane. In both I felt a comfortable relationship. Here on the Gold Coast I am using a busy multi doctor practise and have seen several doctors. That was probably my fault by asking for the first available appointment with any doctor instead of asking for my Personal Care Provider. Today I asked for the first available appointment with my PCP. She spent a long time with me discussing my injury, treatment so far and pain management medication. I was impressed and felt comfortable with her suggested course of pain relief along with anti- inflammatory drugs. We will review the plan in two weeks.

I bought elastic shoe laces at the Ascic Shoe store yesterday and used my walking shoes for the first time today. I was able to put on my own shoes today and needed no help with tying laces. This gives me huge independence. I can now put on my shoes and go for a walk whenever I please. I do not need to wait for someone to tie my laces.

Yee Har!!!

Tuesday 22nd September.

Wow! My first real sleep since my injury almost 8 weeks ago. Yes, I woke once during the night, wandered around the house for a few minutes and went back to bed and slept until 6am.

This was another Yee Har day.

Wednesday 23rd September

Another big Wow! And a Yee Har! Using the night time pain management suggested by my PCP I slept all night. I woke at 5.30am.

Another milestone this morning. As well as being able to put on my own shoes I was able to zip up my jacket this morning.

Thursday 24th September

Donnis woke early enough so we could go for a walk along the Broadwater. Oh it was wonderful walking in bright sunlight, looking at the stunningly clear water and breathing the salt air.

This morning I first had x-rays taken of my wrist and hand. I asked the technician to include my pinkie finger which has given me a good deal of discomfort and does not react as it orta. Next we saw the surgeon. It took him 4 minutes to review the x-rays, tell me to discontinue the Panedeine Forte (yeah right, as if I am gunna discontinue that which gives me enough pain relief so I can get some sleep.) declare all looks good and to see him in 6 weeks. He did not even look at my hand! Grrrr! I stayed seated and explained – politely – about my pinkie finger and the pain it gives. Perhaps it was broken also. He reviewed the x-rays again and declared there was no break but there is a large nerve, the Ulna, which runs along the side of the pinkie and it was probably injured in the fall and would take months to heal.

Goodbye!

We then went to a large shopping centre with parking space for over 2,000 cars. Parked 10 cars away from us was RALLYE! All polished and gleaming in the sun,looking heartbreakingly – good. I hope the new owner treats it well. What a coincidence to find RALLYE after 6 months since it was traded on i30.

Tonight I was in considerable pain so took Panedene Forte after dinner so I can get some sleep. I gave the surgeon a virtual “finger” while doing so.

Friday 25th September

Not much to report today.

Slept well overnight. Woke once then quickly back to sleep. What a change from a month ago, even two weeks ago. I was waking at around 2am seeking pain relief and staying awake watching TV or playing on the computer. I still have pain…nerve pain which means apart from the feel of cold and a pins n needles type of constant pain, there are jolts of nerve electricity, powerful enough to make me yelp and sometimes bounce in my seat.

Awake by 6.30, put on my own shoes and went for a walk.

After lunch Donnis drove to Brisbane to visit grandson Chris. Donnis is on a no wheat diet so I took the opportunity to eat spaghetti bolognaise for dinner. That was the highlight of my day.

Saturday 26th September

Today was like a mirror image of yesterday with Donnis arriving home after dinner.

Sunday 27th September

We were both awake early and started packing for our big trip. We are off to Mackay and Airlie Beach.

Donnis drove for 13 hours. We arrived at sister Shan’s house, in Mackay, at 11 pm and were quickly in bed and pushing up ZZZZZ’s all night.

453. Doors…

23/08/2015

It has been quite some time since I shared doors with you.

The last year, one way or another has been busy. Now that I have a forced relaxation and some time on my hands, (actually that should be singular hand as one is still out of action) trying to type and upload photos is strangely therapeutic and for a time at least, takes my mind off the discomfort…

For the life of me I cannot recall exactly the location of this door except it was in the village of Chemainus on Vancouver Island.

For the life of me I cannot recall exactly the location of this door except it was in the village of Chemainus on Vancouver Island.

Chemainus is a small village on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. It was an unincorporated logging village established in 1858. Later a wood chip mill was established but these days the village is better known for 39 murals throughout the shopping precinct along with local arts and crafts and funky eateries. Interesting buildings and doors add to its charm.

Catholic Church Armidale

Catholic Church Armidale

Saints Mary & Joseph Catholic Church at Armidale is well endowed with many interesting doors…external as well as internal

032 clock the rocks

Hmmm! I am unable to positively identify this doorway set in magnificent sandstone in a building in the area of Loftus and Bridge Streets Sydney. Any history or architecture readers are welcome to provide positive identification.

The old Citizens Mutual Life Insurance building at Inverell. NSW.

The old Citizens Mutual Life Insurance building at Inverell. NSW.

The CML Assurance company no longer exists but the building is now used by several businesses. I recall as a teenager, fresh from High School and just started work. Assurance salesmen were allowed to speak with you in the workplace. I agreed to accept a CML Life endowment policy which I maintained for 10 years finally cashing it in when we built our second house and needed funds.

Uralla. NSW.

Uralla. NSW.

The old town of Uralla has many old buildings and of course doors. The town of Uralla is in the New England district of NSW and is an historic town established in 1850 when gold was discovered at Rocky River. Along with the gold came bushrangers. The most famous of these was Captain Thunderbolt who wandered the New England District apparently robbing the rich and giving to the poor. Or at least giving to the poor who supported or gave him shelter. His grave is located in the Uralla Cemetery.

Dorrigo. NSW

Dorrigo. NSW

Dorrigo is another small historic town in the Bellingen District, sitting atop the Great Dividing Range looking towards the coastal strip. The original reason for the town was its location to cart Red Cedar via the escarpment to the coast as well as to Armidale, the next major town in the New England District. These days many of the old buildings are gone, along with the old style doors and architecture.

Theatre Church Glen Innes. NSW.

Theatre Church Glen Innes. NSW.

The Chapel Theatre was originally a Methodist Church built in 1885 in the New England District town of Glen Innes. The Glen Innes Arts Council purchased the church in 1983 and set about converting it to a modern cinema. So modern in fact that they screen 3D Digital Dolby Stereo movies.

Glenmore Hotel. The Rocks, Sydney. NSW.

Glenmore Hotel. The Rocks, Sydney. NSW.

The Glenmore Hotel was built in 1921 by the brewing company, Tooth & Co (it no longer exists) The hotel is a pre Harbour Bridge icon in Cumberland Street, The Rocks, Sydney and is still popular today, retaining some of the original architecture and walls. The rooftop garden which has grand views of the Opera House and Sydney Harbour is also open on weekends for lunch, dinner and music.

Once a door. Guyra NSW.

Once a door. Guyra NSW.

This is a “Once Upon A Time” doorway. There was once a door here. It gave access to a rooftop garden, The town of Guyra, New England District, NSW, was like many towns established in the mid to late 1800’s. It was wealthy town, somehow the wealth being accumulated via potato farming and dairying. The town is still well known for spuds and lamb.

Art & Crafts Hall Central Tilba. NSW.

Art & Crafts Hall Central Tilba. NSW.

Tilba on the south coast of NSW is a confusing town. It is also known as Central Tilba while the sister village a few Klms to the south is known as Tilba Tilba. Both villages it seems are classified by the National Trust. All the original buildings are maintained in a condition akin of the previous century.  The main industry is dairy.

More doors to come in the months ahead.

 

 

362. Sunday 9th March 2014. WOT THE!!! Not another cyclone!!!

09/03/2014

Monday 3rd March

At first light each day a herd of Laughing Kookaburra’s arrive and settle in the trees around the house and proceed to have a comedy festival and laugh themselves silly until I wake.

Thanks .

In the evening, at last light they come back and give en encore performance of raucous laughter at some joke only they seem to understand.

OMG! March already! It only seems yesterday we arrived for a visit and I was offered work and we moved into Flametree and then Donnis was offered a contract at Collarenebri and she is now 1600 Klms away. It has been 4 months since we arrived.

The rain is back today after a fine hot weekend.

Rainy season, remember?

Time for a bit of reflection.

The month of March.

2005. During this month we bought our first motorhome, a converted Toyota Coaster Bus. At the same time we had a holiday in New Zealand.

2006. March was a wet month and in fact we did not go anywhere of significance.

2007. This month we did much the same as we did the year before. It was a busy time of year at work.

2008. After surviving a cyclone in February we went, with our club, The Mackay Sugarloafers,  to a Country Music Festival at Finch Hatton. Of course we stayed in our Coaster Motorhome and visited daughter Melissa who lives nearby.

2009. We got married last month, survived the fringes of cyclone HAMISH and began our three month trip to Tasmania.

2010. The usual heavy rain, heat and humidity for this time of year. Donnis arrives home from three months in Canada, Cyclone Ului bashes us with a direct hit including trees falling on the house and garage roof. After a post cyclone cleanup we do “nuffin;” Just relax.

2011. I have retired and we started on our big trip – theoretically around OZ – but we took on a three month housesit at Traveston on the Sunshine coast and while Donnis is in Canada, I explore the Sunshine Coast.

2012. We are in Culcairn NSW not far from  Wagga Wagga, Albury and the Murray River. We explore much of the area along the Murray River, the NSW Alps and experience a flood which created havoc for many people.

2013. Donnis arrives home from Canada and we leave the housesit at Guyra where I have been since November. We travel to the coast and visit family and friends in Sydney and Wollongong then continue along the south coast as far as Bega. We then turn around head north again stopping in Sydney to enjoy the Sydney Royal Easter Show. A first for Donnis and a first in 40 years for me.

 

2014. This month will unfold week by week with as yet unkown events.

Tuesday 4th March

Well. Waddayaknow???

Can you believe there is another Tropical Low in the Coral Sea north east of Cairns? It is expected to form into a Tropical Cyclone by the weekend and travel down the coast before crossing somewhere to the south of Cairns.

Oh golly golly. We are south of Cairns.

I am facing a possible 2nd cyclone this year.

I ordered my Lumix (Panasonic) FZ200 camera on Thursday. It arrived from Hong Kong today. The user manual is 200 pages. So far I managed to attach the lens cap, the lens hood, set the language, set the time, charge the spare battery and insert a newly formatted 2Gb memory card from the FZ50

Hmmm! That’s taken care of pages 1 to 15, only 185 pages to read and understand!

 

Wednesday 5th March

A potential cycle has been forecast and the beach is almost deserted...

A potential cycle has been forecast and the beach is almost deserted…

...that's because all the backpackers and sunbathers and watchers, and appreciators oh and swimmers are at the lagoon. Fresh clean water no stingers, sharks or crocodiles, lots of grass to sit or lie upon and close to toilets showers and shops. Not only that but it is free!

…that’s because all the backpackers and sunbathers and watchers, and appreciators oh and swimmers are at the lagoon. Fresh clean water no stingers, sharks or crocodiles, lots of grass to sit or lie upon and close to toilets showers and shops. Not only that but it is free!

Another cruise ship is parked in the bay off Airlie Beach. This one is impressive and with my new FZ200 it was time to take a few photographs. My old (now damaged) FZ50 had a 10 times zoom. This new camera is smaller but packs more features and has a 24 times zoom. In the photo you can clearly read the name of the ship. (Celebrity X Cruises – Celebrity Solstice) Even magnifying old photos of cruise ships I could find the name let alone read it.

Yet another cruise ship is parked out in the bay. With my new camera with 24 times zoom you can easily read the name of the ship.

Yet another cruise ship is parked out in the bay. With my new camera with 24 times zoom you can easily read the name of the ship.

Thursday 6th March

We are now in a “Cyclone Watch” phase. That means to expect a cyclone to form over the next few days and prepare for strong gale force winds and lots of drenching flooding rain and possible tidal surges.

Friday 7th March

I managed to get a couple of loads of washing hung on the verandah and it all dried except for the socks. It has been gusty winds and showers all day. The tropical low is still just a low but will turn into a cyclone by Saturday or Sunday and cross the coast, somewhere south of Cairns on Monday. I made another two flyscreens but it is time to pack things away in the garage. Tomorrow and Sunday will be interesting as the wind picks up and the rain …real heavy rain…begins.

Saturday 8th March

The official tracking map now shows the path of the  cyclone, when it forms, will cross the coast between Bowen and Airlie Beach.

I drove to Mackay to have lunch with daughter Avery. It is her birthday on Wednesday and I may not have another chance next week. With a cyclone threatening and predicted heavy rains to begin this afternoon, I planned a trip to have lunch and then drive home again. Mackay, a tropical river city which is also on the coast was sunny with gusty winds. No sign of rain clouds. The Canelands Shopping Centre was built beside the mangroves bordering the Pioneer River. After the most recent extensions were completed in 2011 a set of walkways, bicycle trails, rest areas, picnic spots, river overlooks and parklands were built across the street from the shopping centre with views and walks beside the river.

One of several stairways and entrances to the pathnways and cycle tracks through the mangroves and tidal grasslands beside the Pioneer River.

One of several stairways and entrances to the pathnways and cycle tracks through the mangroves and tidal grasslands beside the Pioneer River.

At extreme high tide this bridges and pathways are underwater.

At extreme high tide this bridges and pathways are underwater.

Riverside entrance tio Canelands Shopping Centre.

Riverside entrance tio Canelands Shopping Centre.

Looking across at the picnic shelter and overlook nof the Pioneer River as viewded from the outside deck area of the shopping centre food hall.

Looking across at the picnic shelter and overlook nof the Pioneer River as viewded from the outside deck area of the shopping centre food hall.

This was my first chance to have a quick walk along one of the paths and appreciate the planning and work which h went into improving this once inaccessible part of the river.     The family and I enjoyed lunch at the Mt.Pleasant Tavern then back to Averyl’s where Paul’s parents, Pam and Jerry,  had  just arrived in their motorhome from Bundaberg. After an hour of relaxation I headed home and did not encounter rain until about 15 Klms from home.

Sunday 9th March

Rain and strong gusty winds all night.

Cannonvale Beach with the wreck of Whitsunday Magic.

Cannonvale Beach with the wreck of Whitsunday Magic.

Rain rain rain looking from Cannonvale Beach to Abel Point Marina.

Rain rain rain looking from Cannonvale Beach to Abel Point Marina.

Still no cyclone but the low is sitting off the coast and predicted to head north tomorrow before moving back closer to the coast between Bowen and Airlie Beach.

Sigh!

Strong winds and rain all day. There is really nothing more to report except the Tropical Low is sitting just off the coast and strong winds have whipped through the trees with driving rain all day. As well the temperature has dropped. I am wearing winter bed socks which I have not worn since the cold of Guyra last February. I am also wearing a winter gown around the house and last night  had a blanket on the bed.

We will know more about the cyclone when it happens.

355. Doors

19/01/2014

Doors can be wonderful conversation pieces if the are large or unusual. They can be totally ignored even when unusual. They tend to keep the outside world out and the inside world, umm err, in. In our travels we have captured images of interesting doors which highlights some of the many places we have visited.

Grain Growers Building Entrance, Inverell, Central Western NSW.

Grain Growers Building Entrance, Inverell, Central Western NSW.

Staff entrance? At an empty shop at Guyra, New England District, NSW.

Staff entrance? At an empty shop at Guyra, New England District, NSW.

Carriage House entrance in Argyle Street, The Rocks, Sydney, NSW.

Carriage House entrance in Argyle Street, The Rocks, Sydney, NSW.

Entrance to the Mill Museum, which, strangely was once a...Mill.. Uralla, New England District, NSW.

Entrance to the Mill Museum, which, strangely was once a…Mill.. Uralla, New England District, NSW.

This building was erected in 1845 in Cumberland Street in the Rocks district of Sydney and if you look closely at the lower keyhole it suggests thbis may have been the original door. It was once known as "LILLYDALE" as an Inn but was originally built to be a Gentlemens Residence.

This building was erected in 1845 in Cumberland Street in the Rocks district of Sydney and if you look closely at the lower keyhole it suggests this may have been the original door. It was once known as “LILLYDALE” as an Inn but was originally built to be a Gentlemens Residence.

What a wonderful gate which catches the eye instantly at Armidale, New England District, NSW. Even more interesting is it is a back gate opening onto a little used car park.

What a wonderful gate which catches the eye instantly at Armidale, New England District, NSW. Even more interesting is it is a back gate opening onto a little used car park.

Cataract Dam in the hinterland behind Wollongong has a number or turret like structures with sold timberr doors.

Cataract Dam in the hinterland behind Wollongong has a number or turret like structures with sold timberr doors.

Old church which is now a movie theatre at Glen Innes in the New England district of northern NSW.

Old church which is now a movie theatre at Glen Innes in the New England district of northern NSW.

The old tomber built Dromaderry Hotel at Central Tilba on the NSW South Coast is an interesting building its own right. However, standing across the street and looking at it with a critical eye it seems to be a fire hazard. Old, old timber and around 100 years of paint. I liked the door though.

The old tomber built Dromaderry Hotel at Central Tilba on the NSW South Coast is an interesting building its own right. However, standing across the street and looking at it with a critical eye it seems to be a fire hazard. Old, old timber and around 100 years of paint. I liked the door though.

A side gate on and old uninteresting house at Dorrigo NSW on the Great Dividing Range.

A side gate on and old uninteresting house at Dorrigo NSW on the Great Dividing Range.

315.Doors. Most often we take them for granted…

14/05/2013

In our travels we have spied many interesting doors. Many have been worthy of a photograph. In fact for the first year we never even thought to photograph these portals into another world. What follows, in no particular chronological order, are a collection of doors we encountered during our travels.

I stopped in Coolamon southern NSW while on my way north in October 2010. I stayed three nights in the council campground because:

It was cheap. Only $10 per night.

I had power and it was raining and cold. Power was used to fire up the reverse cycle air conditioner which was used to keep me warm.

The town had interesting buildings and history.

Most importantly I had nowhere to be for a few weeks so this town was as good as any to stay awhile.

 

Dunny door, Coolamon NSW.

Dunny door, Coolamon NSW.

All the shops fronting the big wide main street had a service lane-way behind them. Once upon a time all the shops had outside stables and toilets beside the back lane-way.

Typical stables and dunny behind Coolamon shops.

Typical stables and dunny behind Coolamon shops.

We travelled to Taylors Arm, the small town with the local hotel reputedly the place where the song, “The Pub With No Beer” was written.

Museum Taylors Arm, NSW.

Museum Taylors Arm, NSW.

This doorway to a Doctors surgery in The Rocks area of Sydney NSW is typical of many of the doors on the old buildings in the area.

Doctors surgery The Rocks, Sydney, NSW.

Doctors surgery The Rocks, Sydney, NSW.

Many of the oldest buildings in the New England district of NSW, particularly Armidale, Guyra, Glen Innes and Uralla are built from locally made clay bricks known as Armidale Blue. Typically the old buildings have sturdy doors as well.

Catholic church Guyra NSW.

Catholic church Guyra NSW.

We stayed in a caravan park called Kidmans Camp on the north bank of the Darling River in the western NSW town of Bourke. The area is well known as the beginning of “the back o Bourke” a colloquialism for “in the middle of nowhere”. This old outdoor dunny became a telephone booth then as telephone booths became obsolete it is now a curiosity.

Once and outback dunny, now a public phone booth on the Kidman property, now a caravan park at Bourke, western NSW.

Once and outback dunny, now a public phone booth on the Kidman property, now a caravan park at Bourke, western NSW.

This gateway opens onto a brick paved courtyard between two buildings in Uralla NSW leads to an empty car-park.

Not so much a door but a gateway which leads to an empty carpark in the once prosperous New England, NSW town of Uralla.

Not so much a door but a gateway which leads to an empty carpark in the once prosperous New England, NSW town of Uralla.

Armidale Courthouse is a wonderful old building full of charm and character. It is a pity the building will become empty in 2013 when the court is moved to a newer building. Council is taking submissions for future use proposals.

Solid timber doors, as you would expect, are a feature of the Armidale Courthouse. The courthouse will be closed and moved to new premises. The old building is open to submissions from interested businesses and groups.

Solid timber doors, as you would expect, are a feature of the Armidale Courthouse. The courthouse will be closed and moved to new premises. The old building is open to submissions from interested businesses and groups.

The old Commercial banking Company of Sydney building at Inverell in NSW has been used by a number of tenants since the bank was amalgamated with National Australia Bank sometime in the 1980’s. Currently it is part of the courthouse precinct and houses the Sheriffs Office.

The north central NSW town of Inverell has lots of old buildings ewrected when the town was young and gold, precious gems and other in demand minerals were mined in the district. This is the original Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, Inverell branch doorway.

The north central NSW town of Inverell has lots of old buildings erected when the town was young and gold, precious gems and other in demand minerals were mined in the district. This is the original Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, Inverell branch doorway.

Ahhh! Tumburumba NSW in the southern NSW Alpine area. Those doors suggest it is warm inside.

This sturdy pair of doors is located in the small NSW Alpine town of Tumburumba.

This sturdy pair of doors is located in the small NSW Alpine town of Tumburumba.

I stayed here in September 2012. It was a great base for exploring around the Alpine areas of Victoria. The barn was toasty warm if I kept the slow combustion stove burning all day and night. I enjoyed staying here and the wonderful views of snow capped mountains all around the valley at Mt.Beauty.

These wonderful Redwood doors grace the wonderful barn I lived in late August and September 2012. The property is located in the Victorian Alps at Mt.Beauty, just below the snowline in sight of Mt.Bogong and several other snow capped mountains. The barn was heated by a wonderful wood burning stove and provided I kept the fire going 24/7 I was comfortable inside.

These wonderful Redwood door’s grace the wonderful barn I lived in late August and September 2012. The property is located in the Victorian Alps at Mt.Beauty, just below the snowline in sight of Mt.Bogong and several other snow capped mountains. The barn was heated by a wonderful wood burning stove and provided I kept the fire going 24/7 I was comfortable inside.

305. More Doors…

21/03/2013

Back at Post 288 at the beginning of December 2012 I introduced photos of DOORS. While we have been on the road I have often taken a photo of a door as it appealed to me. It seems I am not alone with this doortography as I have seen many photo collections and calendars and even paintings of doors.

So, here we go once more with another collection of 10 doors in random order.

Appropriately these doors made from Western Red Cedar in a barn like building made out of Western Red Cedar are located at Mt.Beauty in Victoria just below the snow line in the Victorian Alps. I lived here for six weeks in  August and September 2012 when I house sat for Peter and Lorna B. Although large and rambling it was a comfortable home with a wonderful wood fireplace which kept it all nice and cosy.

What a lovely set of doors at Mt. Beauty in Victoria.

What a lovely set of doors at Mt. Beauty in Victoria.

While on a visit to Tumbarumba NSW I found these solid timber doors begging to be photographed. I know there were many fine examples of interesting doors in the town but I was too busy being a rubber necked tourist to think too much about taking photos.

These double doors at Tumbarumba NSW were the entrance to a private residence within a commercial building.

These double doors at Tumbarumba NSW were the entrance to a private residence within a commercial building.

I visited the town of Inverell NSW and one of my plans was to locate the Commercial Bank of Australia premises but I saw many doors walking the streets (more photos in future posts) and still did not find the CBA bank building. I did however, find the CBC bank building.

 

These solid doors are the original on the Commercial Banking Company of Sydney (now absorbed/taken over by/aquired by the National Australia Bank) at Inverell NSW.

These solid doors are the original on the Commercial Banking Company of Sydney (now absorbed/taken over /aquired by the National Australia Bank) at Inverell NSW.

The Courthouse at Armidale was built 1859-1860. A new courthouse is being built nearby. The courthouse is still business as usual and staff were a little uncomfortable with photographs being taken inside the building. These Red Cedar doors leading to courtroom 2 are typical of the ornate timber work throughout the building.

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One of several heavy timber doors gracing the old Courthouse at Armidale.

One of several heavy timber doors gracing the old Courthouse at Armidale.

About 15 Klms from the historic town  City of Armidale is the equally historic town of Uralla. The old buildings provided many doortography opportunities. Although strictly speaking this is not a door but is was eye catching anyway.

OK OK its not a door but it is inside a covered area between two buildings forming an arcade with nothing in it and leading to a car-park at Uralla NSW.

OK OK its not a door but it is inside a covered area between two buildings forming an arcade with nothing in it and leading to a car-park at Uralla NSW.

Way out in western NSW on the edge of the desert in the beginning of the red sand country is the old historic town of Bourke. There are so many old buildings with intriguing doors that I wandered around the main streets but had forgotten my camera. Duh! This photo of an old “dunny”    ( Dunny or dunny can is Australian slang for toilet, either the room or the specific fixture, especially an outhouse or other outdoor toilets.) was taken at the Kidman Bush Camp Camp Ground where we were staying. The old dunny is now used as a a public phone booth.

The door on this wonderful useful old builing was once a privacy screen on an outside toilet in the western NSW town of Bourke.

The door on this wonderful useful old building was once a privacy screen on an outside toilet in the western NSW town of Bourke.

St.Mary of the Angel Catholic Church at Guyra is built from bricks made from clay found only at a site near Armidale Airport. The clay is no longer available but many buildings, particularly churches and public buildings in Armidale, Guyra, Glen Innes and Uralla were made from the “Armidale Blue” bricks. Oh, and the church doors are solid wood.

Another solid timber door on the Catholic Church at Guyra NSW.

Another solid timber door on the Catholic Church at Guyra NSW.

While doing our December 2012, walking tour around The Rocks,  original settlement of Australia, there were so many interesting doors I thought I would never stop taking photos. Reason prevailed and only one is shown here today. This door opens to a doctors surgery in one of the original heritage listed buildings at 37 George St Sydney.

This door on a terrace house at Lower George Street Sydney NSW is the entrance to a doctors surgery. Note the traditional doctors surgery red light to the top right of the door.

This door on a terrace house at Lower George Street Sydney NSW is the entrance to a doctors surgery. Note the traditional doctors surgery red light to the top right of the door.

Taylors Arm is a small community west of Kempsey NSW. The town pushes the theory that this was the location of the original Pub With No Beer. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Pub_with_No_Beer ) This distinction is challenged by  the town of Ingham in north Queensland but numbers seem to favour Taylors Arm as the original. At the back of the Pub With No Beer is a small historical museum which itself is of some interest. The building is an old church and was rescued from demolition by the publican and carted to its present location. The museum houses all sorts of memorabillia about the area and the PWNB.

The Pub With No Beer song was purportedly written about the pub at Taylors Arm near Kempsey NSW. These doors open onto the little museum to honour the Pub With No Beer.

The Pub With No Beer song was purportedly written about the pub at Taylors Arm near Kempsey NSW. These doors open onto the little museum to honour the Pub With No Beer.

The words to the famous song are…

Songwriters: Parsons, Gordon Noel

 

Oh it’s-a lonesome away from your kindred and all
By the campfire at night we’ll hear the wild dingoes call
But there’s-a nothing so lonesome, morbid or drear
Than to stand in the bar of a pub with no beer
Now the publican’s anxious for the quota to come
And there’s a far away look on the face of the bum
The maid’s gone all cranky and the cook’s acting queer
Oh what a terrible place is a pub with no beer
Then the stockman rides up with his dry dusty throat
He breasts up to the bar and pulls a wad from his coat
But the smile on his face quickly turns to a sneer
As the barman says sadly the pub’s got no beer
Then the swaggie comes in smothered in dust and flies
He throws down his roll and rubs the sweat from his eyes
But when he is told, he says what’s this I hear
I’ve trudged fifty flamin’ miles to a pub with no beer
Now there’s a dog on the v’randa, for his master he waits
But the boss is inside drinking wine with his mates
He hurries for cover and he cringes in fear
It’s no place for a dog ’round a pub with no beer
And old Billy the blacksmith, the first time in his life
Why he’s gone home cold sober to his darling wife
He walks in the kitchen, she says you’re early Bill dear
But then he breaks down and tells her the pub’s got no beer
Oh it’s hard to believe that there’s customers still
But the money’s still tinkling in the old ancient till
The wine buffs are happy and I know they’re sincere
When they say they don’t care if the pub’s got no beer
So it’s-a lonesome away from your kindred and all
By the campfire at night we’ll hear the wild dingoes call
But there’s-a nothing so lonesome, morbid or drear-
as to stand in the bar of a Pub With No Beer.

The final selection is another toilet door located at Coolamon in south west NSW. Strictly speaking this is not a dunny door. Dunny usually refers to pit or dunny can style toilets without flushing facilities. This dunny is still in use, has flushing facilities and is called a dunny by the locals. Therefore this is a dunny door.

An outdoor toilet, still in use at Coolamon, NSW.

An outdoor toilet, still in use at Coolamon, NSW.

Oh, by the way, in Oz slang we often hear a description of a large solidily built man OR woman referred to as being “built like brick dunny”. As you can see, it is a solid building.

Cheers until Sunday.